Dublin’s Blackrock baths demolished

The historic Blackrock baths in south Co. Dublin have been demolished because they are too dangerous according to local council authorities, who blamed extensive weather damage and “the ravages of the sea.”

The Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown town council cited the rusted-away guard rails to the upper seating area and the corroded high-diving platform, once used by some of Ireland's champion divers. In addition the facility is marred by extensive graffiti and dumped rubbish. Authorities said they are currently preparing proposals to make improvements to the seafront.

The local railway company first built the baths in 1839 beside Blackrock train station, and in 1887 they were rebuilt in concrete. With the advent of heated, indoor swimming pools in Ireland in the 1960s, the outdoor venue saw a decline in usage and by the 1980s the seabaths were closed down.

 In 1997 the site was bought by a property company and, although various redevelopment proposals were mooted, including seafront apartments, none of the plans were implemented.

For generations a coastal landmark, the baths regularly hosted swimming galas, high-diving and water polo competitions in the 50m pool and could accommodate up to 1,000 spectators.