Parking fines in Amsterdam hit record

Revenue from parking fines in Amsterdam totaled €166 million in 2013 or €9 million more than in 2012.

This is partly due to an increase in the parking spaces available, in part to an increase in fines and in part to more effective enforcement, thanks to additional electronic scanning which makes it possible to carry out more checks with half the staff. Collection of fines for cars with foreign registration plates also became more effective during the year, thanks to greater cooperation from other countries.

The number of traffic jams throughout the country fell by eight per cent compared with 2012, according to figures from the Rijkswaterstadt, which is part of the ministry of public works and water. Over 94 per cent of journeys in rush hour reached their destination in the expected time. Although this is an improvement on the 2012 figures new lane capacity is now full and people are using their cars more frequently.

By 2020 it is estimated that traffic will increase between 10-35 per cent, according to the Rijkswaterstadt 2012 annual review. Priorities will therefore have to switch from increased new lane construction to better and a more intelligent use of the road network.

The aim of the Rijkswaterstadt, which looks after the country’s motorways, roads, tunnels, bridges and waterways, is that by 2020 motorists travelling in rush hour should be able to reach their destination punctually 95 per cent of the time.

Three million motorists take to the roads every day in the Netherlands, which is a transport and distribution hub for much of western Europe.